I was going on a train from Manchester to London and I was looking out of the window at some cows, I believe, and I just thought: “Boy doesn’t know he’s a wizard - goes off to wizard school.” I have no idea where it came from. I think the idea was floating along the train and looking for someone and my mind was vacant enough so it decided to zoom in there.
While Fitzgerald liked to boast of his raw talent that allowed him to come up with clever stories for the Post or The Smart Set in mere hours, biographers have noted that he spent months pouring over drafts — a perfectionist making revision after revision. For better or for worse, creativity and focus are inextricably linked. As Andreasen said, “This type of thinking is often inseparable from the suffering. If you’re at the cutting edge, then you’re going to bleed.”
Let me be the first to admit: I belong to the cult of shiny. I moved to NYC, joined shiny studios, and tried to start some shiny startups. I like shiny. I want my job, my designs, my whole damn life to be shiny.
Paris presses you right up against a gorgeous limestone wall, like a hungry lover, and forces you to remember a forgotten part of yourself. She reminds you that you are more than your hard work, you are more than struggle, striving, and stress. She whispers, “You are poetry, you are beauty, you are magic, you are worthy of worship. Let me serve you the best, the most beautiful, the most delectable. Let me surround you with inspiration, with gorgeous gardens, beautiful cathedrals, winding rivers, exquisite art, to remind you that you are fabulous. This beauty that you have been longing for has been longing for you.”
When your surroundings are beautiful – and what is more beautiful than Paris? – the ascension from good to better is easier. It is in Paris that each of us can learn what it takes to ascend, and we can make sure to pour that missing trace element back into our lives when we return home.
Don’t worry about people stealing your design work. Worry about the day they stop.
— Jeffrey Zeldman
Krauss’s most important message wasn’t an overt one. In fact, what makes her books especially exceptional is that she frequently featured female protagonists — far from the norm at the time and, sadly, still an exception half a century later when only 31% of books feature female lead characters. It may seem like a simple thing — the seemingly benign choice of hero or heroine in a children’s story — but to offer a quietly dissenting alternative to a piece of hegemonic culture is no small gift. Krauss was a generous gift-giver.
I Can Fly by Ruth Krauss – a vintage treasure (via explore-blog)
The benefit of being a magnet for talent doesn’t wax and wane. It accumulates.
As a venture capitalist, people often ask me why big companies have trouble innovating while small companies seem to be able to do it so easily. My answer is generally unexpected. Big companies have plenty of great ideas, but they do not innovate because they need a whole hierarchy of people to agree that a new idea is good in order to pursue it. If one smart person figures out something wrong with an idea — often to show off or to consolidate power — that’s usually enough to kill it.
Marriage is not the answer, but it is the most demanding way to live the question. Don’t ask questions. Live them.
— Michael Ventura, as quoted in "Honey, I want to Move to Mars"
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Beautiful Quote #NewPost [9]

beautifulquote:

Beautiful Quote #NewPost [9]